$11 Million Extensive Renovation Completed at Tanya Towers

After two years of extensive renovations, a low-rent apartment building at 620 East 13th Street in Manhattan’s Lower East Side was reopened last week during an official ceremony.

Tanya Towers Lower East Side Manhattan

After two years of extensive renovations, a low-rent apartment building at 620 East 13th Street in Manhattan’s Lower East Side was reopened last week during an official ceremony.

The 10-story Tanya Towers was completed in 1973 and has been offering affordable housing with special support services to low-income individuals who are hard of hearing, deaf, blind or have other disabilities that require assistance. The residential building was developed by New York City under the Mitchell-Lama program that started in 1955 and provides affordable rental and cooperative housing to moderate- and low-income families.

The building was named in honor of Tanya Nash, who for 35 years served as Executive Director of the New York Society for the Deaf. In 2006 the Society merged with Federal Employment Guidance Services (FEGS), a large nonprofit organization and provider of housing and residential services for people with disabilities.

In November 2011 FEGS broke ground on an $11 million renovation that was meant to address the needs of the deaf and hard of hearing residents, but also to transform the 150-unit residential building into a LEED certifiable facility. The project is part of Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s New Housing Marketplace Plan (NHMP) which, to date, has funded the creation or preservation of more than 8,100 affordable housing units in Manhattan Community Board 3 alone.

The renovation designed by TEK Architects includes upgraded community rooms and lobby area, elevator modernization and the installation of an emergency power generator. Additionally, all kitchen and bathrooms were upgraded.

The project was made possible through a $1 million grant from the New York City Council, sponsored by Council Member Rosie Mendez, and a $500,000 grant from the Office of Manhattan Borough President Scott M. Stringer. The remaining funds were made available by financing arranged by HDC and a $6.4 million mortgage financing from the same source.

Photo via NYC HPD Facebook Page