$25M Urban Park and Festival Plaza Make Waves in Westfield

Downtown Westfield will soon become a more vibrant destination with the construction of Grand Junction Plaza, a 10.5-acre park slated to rise southwest of Main and Union streets.

by Adriana Pop, Associate Editor

Downtown Westfield will soon become a more vibrant destination with the construction of Grand Junction Plaza, a 10.5-acre park slated to rise southwest of Main and Union streets.

According to the Indianapolis Business Journal, Westfield city leaders are planning to break ground on the approximately $25 million project this year. Last spring, they commissioned Philadelphia-based Land Collective to design the civic plaza portion of the development and create spaces where people want to gather and interact.

Envisioned as a circuit connecting several elements, the upcoming park, which is crossed by Grassy Branch Creek and one of its tributaries, will include a hub for festivals and seasonal events and a great lawn that leads to an amphitheater. The northeast area of the site will feature a sit-down restaurant, with outdoor seating overlooking the creek and a network of bridges and walkways. On the eastern side, there will be meadows, grassy fields, woodlands and a productive orchard, while on the southeast quadrant of the park, a trailhead pavilion will welcome bikers, pedestrians and golf carts.

“It’s a wonderful opportunity to explore sociology with design,” Land Collective principal David A. Rubin told the newspaper. “When you design with the intent to bring people together, it can be an extraordinary economic generator. People want to be there, and businesses want to be where the people are. It becomes an incredible, beautiful spiral of energy.”

Critics however point at the fact that the cost of the project could burden taxpayers or that the redevelopment does not pay homage to the city’s history. Westfield’s Mayor Andy Cook, on the other hand, argues that the investment will be a major economic development play, similar to Grand Park Sports Campus, a 400-acre, $45 million youth sports facility that opened in 2014.

Photo credits: Land Collective