$657M Settlement Reached With WTC Rescue Workers

The WTC Captive Insurance Company on Thursday announced that a settlement has been reached with attorneys on behalf of more than 10,000 plaintiffs claiming injuries related to the rescue, recovery, and debris removal operations in the wake of the 9/11 terrorist attacks.

March 12, 2010
By Allison Landa, News Editor

Courtesy Flickr Creative Commons user thelastminute

The WTC Captive Insurance Company on Thursday announced that a settlement has been reached with attorneys on behalf of more than 10,000 plaintiffs claiming injuries related to the rescue, recovery, and debris removal operations in the wake of the 9/11 terrorist attacks.

The $657 million settlement will be paid by the federal taxpayer-funded WTC Captive, which was created with a $1 billion FEMA grant to insure the city of New York and its debris removal contractors since the city itself was unable to do so after the attacks.

“The resolution of the World Trade Center litigation will allow the first responders and workers to be compensated for injuries suffered following their work at Ground Zero,” New York mayor Michael Bloomberg said in a statement. “This settlement is a fair and reasonable resolution to a complex set of circumstances. Since September 11th, the City has moved aggressively to provide medical treatment to those who were present at Ground Zero, and we will continue our commitment to treatment and monitoring.”

Plaintiffs have 90 days to review the settlement and opt in by agreeing to its terms, including a release of any future claims against the city and its contractors involved in rescue operations.

In order to get recovery under the settlement, each plaintiff is required to submit proof that he or she was present and participated in the rescue operations, along with specific medical documentation and a written diagnosis confirming their illness or injury.

The settlement also funds a special insurance policy which provides additional compensation to any plaintiff who may contract certain kinds of cancer in the future.