Affordable Housing to Revamp the Bronx

By Veronica Grecu, Associate Editor It may come as a surprise, but for those looking to relocate to the Big Apple, Bronx seems to be the best choice. Thanks to an intensive campaign initiated by county officials and private and public [...]

It may come as a surprise, but for those looking to relocate to the Big Apple, Bronx seems to be the best choice. Thanks to an intensive campaign initiated by county officials and private and public property developers, the perception of this neighborhood has started to improve. Many cost-effective and high-quality homes have been built here since 2008, and developers continue to invest huge amounts of funds for affordable housing projects.

The security in this area has been a major concern for local and federal authorities. With police actively controlling crime, the Bronx has slowly become a safe place to move. As reported by StockMarketsReview.com, the government is carrying on programs meant to improve services, infrastructure and cleanliness for the Bronx’s existing and prospective residents.

A new affordable housing co-op building was inaugurated just last week in the Bronx. The eight-story building is located at 853 Macy Place in Longwood and includes six one-bedroom units, 47 two-bedroom units and 10 three-bedroom units; 16 parking spaces and a fully equipped fitness center. According to The Epoch Times, 14 of the 63 apartments are being reserved for low-income families who will take ownership with help from Habitat for Humanity. To qualify for an apartment, the families had to prove that they needed housing and had a stable income and a good credit score. As part of the Habitat program, they also had to commit to 200 hours of work for the building.

To honor the neighborhood’s long musical tradition, the co-op building was named The Melody; the design follows the musical theme, with score-shaped hand rails, music-themed paintings displayed on the walls and music piped into the staircases. The building was awarded LEED Platinum certification, and it is the first New York residential building to achieve the LEED innovation credit for physical activity.