BAM Fisher is NYC’s First LEED Gold Certified Theater

The US Green Building Council (USGBC) marked another milestone last week when it awarded the LEED Gold Certification for New Construction to the newest addition of the Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAM).

 

The US Green Building Council (USGBC) marked another milestone last week when it awarded the LEED Gold Certification for New Construction to the newest addition of the Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAM). The seven-story Richard B. Fisher Building located at 321 Ashland Place in Fort Greene has just became the first theater in New York City to receive such a recognition that underlines BAM’s goal to create an innovative, world-class arts facility that is able to conserve resources and reduce its environmental impact.

According to property data from PropertyShark, the original red-brick building was completed in 1928. Four years ago BAM announced plans to embark on a multi-million expansion project to create a new, six-story addition to the rear of the historic structure.

Located on the site of the Salvation Army’s former Brooklyn Citadel Corps and referred to as BAM Fisher, the $50 million building opened in September 2012. The expansion project was designed New York architect Hugh Hardy of H3 Hardy Collaboration Architecture, who worked closely with theater consultant Auerbach Pollock Friedlander to create the academy’s first fully-flexible, fully-adaptable performance space since 1987.

The 40,000-square-foot building offers a 250-seat experimental theater that housed over 170 artistic performances and events and provided 1,600 square feet of rehearsal space for 33 community organizations in its first 10 months of full operation.

BAM Fisher’s eco-friendly features include a reduction in water consumption by more than 40% and an energy efficiency system that reduces the greenhouse gas emissions by 22%. The green rooftop, which was designed by Starr Whitehouse Architects and Planners, features native plants to reduce the need for watering and opaque glass paver lights to create an intimate atmosphere at night. The 1,400-square-foot rooftop is used as an outdoor venue for community gatherings and special events.

Renderings courtesy of  H3 Hardy Collaboration Architecture and Starr Whitehouse Architects and Planners