Construction on Skyline Honolulu Condo Project Could Begin This Fall

In the context of an improving economy, plans are moving forward for the long-stalled 140-unit residential condominium complex proposed by an affiliate of local developer Form Partners LLC on the slopes of the Punchbowl crater in Honolulu.

Skyline Honolulu Project Site in Honolulu

In the context of an improving economy, plans are moving forward for the long-stalled 140-unit residential condominium complex proposed by an affiliate of local developer Form Partners LLC on the slopes of the Punchbowl crater in Honolulu.

According to the Pacific Business News, construction on the mid-rise Skyline Honolulu project in Makiki is estimated to begin this fall and be complete on a 14-month schedule. The new development will include two-bedroom condominiums ranging from 700 to 800 square feet and priced between $450,000 and $550,000 per unit. Plans also call for 200 parking spaces and possibly a mix of three- and four-bedroom units.

Richard Matsunaga & Associates Architects Inc. and U.S. Pacific Development will design and build the new five-story complex, which is a scaled-back version of the developer’s initial proposal, approved by the city in 2008. At that time, Form Partners affiliate Prospect Properties intended to develop a 95-unit, four-story building comprising one-, two- and three-bedroom units, but construction had to be postponed because of the Great Recession. In 2007, the firm had acquired and consolidated the development’s 1.6-acre site, which consists of 12 individual residential properties, with the main building located on Prospect Street.

Skyline Honolulu is currently being reviewed by the city and county of Honolulu’s Department of Planning and Permitting and will soon undergo a traffic study.

Form Partners has also completed The Vanguard Lofts on the city’s Kapiolani Boulevard and is currently developing Robertson Properties’ $767 million mixed-use project on the 14-acre site of the former Kamehameha Drive-In Theater in Aiea. Last year, Honolulu Mayor Kirk Caldwell approved the development known as Live Work Play Aiea.

Photo credit: www.formpartners.com