D.C., Nevada Among Top Spots for LEED

In the District, there was 25 square feet of LEED-certified space per person in 2010, while in Nevada there was just shy of 11 square feet of LEED-certified space per person during the same time. The other top states were New Mexico, New Hampshire, Oregon, South Carolina, Washington, Illinois, Arkansas, Colorado and Minnesota.

March 4, 2011
By Allison Landa, News Editor

Courtesy Flickr Creative Commons user Will Palmer

The U.S. Green Building Council released its 2010 list of top 10 states for LEED-certified commercial and institutional green buildings per capita, with the District of Columbia leading the nation and Nevada as the leading state.

In the District, there was 25 square feet of LEED-certified space per person in 2010, while in Nevada there was just shy of 11 square feet of LEED-certified space per person during the same time. The other top states were New Mexico, New Hampshire, Oregon, South Carolina, Washington, Illinois, Arkansas, Colorado and Minnesota.

According to USGBC senior vice president of LEED Scot Horst, 2010 was a trying year for most of the building industry, but in many areas there was still a drive for sustainable development. Notable newly certified projects include the two International Monetary Fund headquarters buildings in downtown D.C., Barcelona Elementary School in Albuquerque and the Bank of America Fifth Avenue Plaza in Seattle.

More than 40,000 projects are currently participating in the commercial and institutional LEED rating systems. That translates to more than 7.9 billion square feet of construction space in all 50 states and 117 countries, with an additional nearly 10,000 homes certified under the LEED for Homes rating system.