Dell Children’s Adds New Tower and Expands Services

By Camelia Bulea, Associate Editor Dell Children’s recently unveiled details on the expansion of its Medical Center, which is currently underway in Austin. Due to the fact that its patient numbers recorded significant growth over the last few years, the company [...]

Dell Children’s recently unveiled details on the expansion of its Medical Center, which is currently underway in Austin. Due to the fact that its patient numbers recorded significant growth over the last few years, the company is expanding its specialty care programs as well as building new programs.

A news release from the company boasts that some of its new care services will rank among the most advanced in pediatric care in Central Texas. Plans include the region’s first comprehensive inpatient rehabilitative care center for kids of all ages.

Although the new tower, which is expected to be completed in May 2013, was included in the Dell Children’s development plan, the timing for the new building was moved up in order to serve the large number of patients. The tower will be equipped with technology that provides more efficient health care delivery while also enhancing patient experience, says Dell Children’s in the news release. Expanded programs include cardiology, orthopedics and sports medicine, neurosciences and a surgical intensive care unit.

The 76,683-square-foot hospital tower will be three floors tall and will include 72 beds. Upon completion, Dell Children’s will be 41 percent larger than its current footprint. When the new tower opens for patients, up to 200 additional employees are expected to be hired over the following year.

The Children’s Medical Center Foundation of Central Texas, the fundraising arm for Dell Children’s, is responsible for raising half of the $48 million required for the project. The remainder will be funded by the Seton Healthcare Family and its parent organization, Ascension Health, as reported by the news release.

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Photo credits: www.dellchildrens.net