Design for New 364-Room Fat City Hotel Approved by CCDC

By Gabriel Circiog, Associate Editor The Centre City Development Corp. has approved the design for a 364-room hotel in San Diego’s Little Italy neighborhood. As previously reported by Commercial Property Executive, architect and developer Jonathan Segal had proposed a new residential development, Fat City Lofts, for the site which is just 100 feet away from [...]

The Centre City Development Corp. has approved the design for a 364-room hotel in San Diego’s Little Italy neighborhood.

As previously reported by Commercial Property Executive, architect and developer Jonathan Segal had proposed a new residential development, Fat City Lofts, for the site which is just 100 feet away from Solar Turbines. The company, which builds gas-powered turbines, opposed the project arguing that the coexistence with the proposed residential development was virtually impossible as it could attract an environmental review that could end up costing 1,800 jobs.

The new plan, proposed by GLJ Partners and Jonathan Segal, calls for the development of a six-story hotel that would incorporate the Art Deco style of the Fat City/Top’s nightclub building, The San Diego Union-Tribune reports.

Located at Pacific Highway and Hawthorn Street, the new development has the support of Solar Turbines. James Umpleby, president of Solar Turbines, confirmed the full support of the company for the two-hotel complex. He told the CCDC board the development would be “a complement to Solar on Harbor Drive”.

Even though the Fat City project now has the support of Solar Turbines, a new group opposing the project has emerged. The hotel union workers have submitted a document highlighting their objections to the project. Certain objections, such as the fact that the hotel employees would not be guaranteed health coverage or living wages, are not usually within the CCDC’s land-use responsibilities.

Following the approval of the design by the CCDC board, chairman Kim Kilkenny will decide on the required development permits.

Rendering Courtesy of: GLJ Partners