Detroit Historical Museum and MOCAD Plan Exhibits Designed Evoke Detroit’s Spirit

Detroit may be facing its own financial crisis but this doesn’t mean Detroiters are giving up on their city. On the contrary, local companies and cultural institutions are asking for their help and engagement in various projects that are meant to bring back Motor City’s lost greatness.

Detroit may be facing its own financial crisis but this doesn’t mean Detroiters are giving up on their city. On the contrary, local companies and cultural institutions are asking for their help and engagement in various projects that are meant to bring back Motor City’s former greatness. An upcoming museum exhibit called “Detroit Decides: Our Most Celebrated Buildings” is one such example that requires public input. Scheduled to be unveiled on February 1, 2014, the project is being created by the Detroit Historical Museum and supported by the Detroit Historical Society.

According to a recent press statement, the exhibit will feature three buildings—along with key facts and stories based on Detroiters’ memories—that best embody the spirit of Detroit. The Society is reaching out to the people living in Detroit and the Metro area and asking them to nominate any past or present building until Friday, August 30, at the Detroit Historical Museum or online at www.detroithistorical.org.

The top three nominations—which could include the historic Whitney Building, the former Nabisco Building, or even the castle-like GAR Building—will be revealed at the end of October and will be staged in the museum’s Allesee Gallery of Culture, which features the iconic people, places and moments that have been distinct for Detroit. “Determining the three buildings to be showcased will be based on the compelling cases made in the nominations,” said Tobi Voigt, chief curatorial officer of the Society.

Lisa Poszywak paints a mural by William E. Jones for MOCAD’s next exhibition The Past is Present

Meanwhile, the award-winning Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit (MOCAD) is getting ready for its next exhibition called “The Past is Present,” which is inspired by Diego Rivera’s 27-panel mural “Detroit Industry.” Financed by the Ford family, the 80-year-old murals were commissioned from celebrated Mexican artist Rivera by the Detroit Institute of Arts to portray the fusion of man and machine. For “The Past is Present” exhibition, scheduled to open on September 6, MOCAD has invited 15 artists from around the world to create new murals based on the history of Detroit, from the riots in 1943 and the decline of the manufacturing industry to the present-day urban gardening movement and social and political change.

Photo via MOCAD’s Facebook page