Detroit Invited to Bid for the 2024 Summer Olympics

25 large cities and metropolitan areas in the country and 10 other city that have expressed interest in hosting an Olympic competition have received letters from the U.S. Olympic Committee (USOC) to see if they would consider bidding for the 2024 Summer Olympic and Paralympic Games.

Twenty-five large cities and metropolitan areas in the U.S. and 10 other international cities that have expressed interest in hosting an Olympic competition have received invitation letters from the U.S. Olympic Committee (USOC) to bid for the 2024 Summer Olympic and Paralympic Games.

Though still fighting to recover from the economic decline that caused a massive loss of population, Detroit was one of the recipients. According to detroit2020.com, the city placed seven bids between 1939 and 1966 to host the summer games but each time gathered only a small number of votes, despite the city’s efforts to win the bids.

Written by USOC Chief Executive Officer Scott A. Blackmun, the invitation to bid letter emphasizes the unparalleled opportunity for a city to evolve socially and economically. Once chosen to stage such an event, a host city would require operating budgets in excess of $3 billion, not including costs related to venue construction and other infrastructure.

USOC  lists a number of infrastructure and financial requirements that an Olympic host city should include:

-          45,000 hotel rooms
-          an international airport that can handle thousands of international travelers per day
-          an Olympic Village that can accommodate 16,500 people and has a 5,000-person
dining hall
-          meeting and operations space for over 15,000 media and broadcasters
-          public transportation service to venues
-          roadway closures to allow exclusive use for games-related transportation
-          a workforce of up to 200,000.

If the authorities decide to bid for the 2024 Games, Motown would compete against major cities that also got the invitation, such as New York, Chicago, Dallas, Boston and Los Angeles. Whether Detroit can stand up to the challenge is debatable, as the city would have to invest huge amounts in order to meet USOC’s requirements, with a focus on renovating and expanding/building new sports venues.

Image via Detroit 2024 Summer Olympic Games Support Facebook Page