Eaglewood Village, Gallivan Plaza Return to Life; University of Utah Grows Solar Ivy

By Gabriel Circiog, Associate Editor Marked by delays since its groundbreaking in 2007, Eaglewood Village may at last be moving forward. According to The Davis County Clipper, the construction team has finalized the access road and officials from Compass Development have communicated [...]

Marked by delays since its groundbreaking in 2007, Eaglewood Village may at last be moving forward. According to The Davis County Clipper, the construction team has finalized the access road and officials from Compass Development have communicated that they intend to start working on multi-family housing. The community is planned to include 1.5 million square feet of residences, shops and offices. The residential units will incorporate townhomes, row homes and lofts. Amenities such as a luxury clubhouse, pools, hot tubs and exercise rooms are meant to increase the appeal of what its developers want to be the largest mixed-use community in Davis County.

Downtown Salt Lake is also returning to life. The latest sign of the revival is the reopening of the newly refurbished Gallivan Plaza, which hosted the first in a series of concerts. The $8.5 million renovation included the expansion of the grass area, a new two-story building with banquet space and an improved ice rink.

In other news, the University of Utah in Salt Lake City is the first to embrace the new face of solar-generated electricity: solar panels shaped like artistically crafted ivy leaves. These leaves will form a colorful arrangement that will decorate the wall’s surface. Called “Solar Ivy,” it was developed by Sustainably Minded Interactive Technology. The idea and most of the funding for the project come from the university’s student Sustainable Campus Initiative Fund.