Feds Continue Construction Frenzy, Selecting CDM for $500M Design-Build Contract

CDM will have its hands full over the next several years. The indefinite delivery, indefinite quantity contract calls for the firm to supply design-build services for a variety of development endeavors to both USCG and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security.

June 1, 2010
By Barbra Murray, Contributing Editor

Courtesy Flickr Creative Commons user stephen.moore

With the real estate market still in the dumps, the federal government is among the few that can still afford to move forward with big-ticket projects like the $500 million, seven-year design-build contract the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) Facilities Design and Construction Center Atlantic just awarded to Cambridge, Mass.-based construction and engineering firm CDM.

CDM will have its hands full over the next several years. The indefinite delivery, indefinite quantity contract calls for the firm to supply design-build services for a variety of development endeavors to both USCG and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. Locations of the projects, which will range in cost from $3 million to $100 million for total maximum of $500 million, will span the country, as well as U.S. territories. CDM will also be responsible for the contract’s separately awarded seed project, which involves the design and construction of a 25,000-square-foot, two-story structure and a 6,800-square-foot support facility in Cape May, N.J. Both facilities, to be developed at a cost of $10 million, will be designed to qualify for LEED certification.

The federal government has been expanding, and with most required funds for projects allotted well in advance on the commencement of development activity, its projects haven’t experienced major hiccups like those of so many private developers. Recent project announcements include the General Services Administration’s tapping of New York City-based Turner Construction Co. to serve as general contractor for the $73 million transformation of a vacant 547,000-square-foot federal building in Washington, D.C., into a premier office property; the conversion is being financed through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. And in mid-May in North Bethesda, Md., just outside of Washington, D.C., joint venture partners Berwyn, Pa.-based LCOR and San Antonio, Tex.-based USAA Real Estate Co. broke ground on a $131 million, 362,000-square-foot office build-to-suit that will house approximately 1,500 employees of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission.