H-E-B Proposes $100M Master Plan for City

By Anca Gagiuc, Associate Editor H-E-B has revealed its plans for a $100 million master plan that would transform the area north of the historic King William neighborhood. The project is designed to be developed in two phases and would encompass almost 27 acres.

H-E-B has revealed its plans for a $100 million master plan that would transform the area north of the historic King William neighborhood. The project is designed to be developed in two phases and would encompass almost 27 acres.

The ambitious plan includes the expansion of its headquarters, the construction of a grocery store – Flores Market, several mixed-use buildings, new public spaces, and a pedestrian and bike trail along South Flores, between Chávez and Arsenal streets. Furthermore, H-E-B would double its current workforce and move the 1,600 workers in the downtown campus by 2030. Flores Market would offer prepared foods, dinner-to-go, a bakery and deli, fresh meat and produce, wine and beer selections, as well as dairy and frozen foods.

“Our proposal is much more than just a downtown store,” said Craig Boyan in an interview with the San Antonio Express-News. “We think that we can help make South Flores and the San Pedro Creek a great street and a great redevelopment area in the city, perhaps like another Southtown.”

Mayor Julián Castro said in a phone interview with the newspaper that the investment “goes directly into our local economy (and) does have a spillover effect to the rest of the area,”, calling it a significant economic development project.

The first phase has an estimated cost of $40 million and features a culinary school with a test kitchen and renovation of 1601 Nogalitos St., the store downtown and connected gas station. A 24-foot pedestrian and bike path is also included in the construction.

Phase II has an estimated cost that ranges between $60 million and $80 million. It includes the addition of green space in the San Pedro Creek area, several mixed-use buildings north of the culinary school, as well as a new office building with underground parking.

The results of a traffic study considering the impact of closing Main Avenue are expected to be sent to the city early next month. Despite some criticism, Mayor Castro seems to see the opportunity: “Imagine if we didn’t have that in San Antonio, and we were looking at somebody saying they would put all of these jobs in the middle of downtown,” he said. “We’d be falling over ourselves for that kind of investment.”