Interbake’s Old Factory Finds New Life as Upscale Lofts

By Adrian Maties, Associate Editor A venerable Richmond factory where Girl Scout Cookies were once baked is finding a second life as an apartment complex. Following a $24 million makeover, the FFV Interbake Building officially reopened Nov. 15 as the Cookie Factory Lofts. From 1927 to 2006, the six-story factory served as the headquarters and [...]

The distinctive neon roof-top sign once again brightens the Richmond skyline.

A venerable Richmond factory where Girl Scout Cookies were once baked is finding a second life as an apartment complex. Following a $24 million makeover, the FFV Interbake Building officially reopened Nov. 15 as the Cookie Factory Lofts.

From 1927 to 2006, the six-story factory served as the headquarters and main production plant of Interbake Foods, Inc., known earlier as the Southern Biscuit Works Co. or Famous Foods of Virginia. After Interbake relocated eight years ago, its 255,000-square-foot home sat vacant.

The building’s next chapter began in 2013, when the Rebkee Co. purchased it with the intention of transforming it into a residential property. Rebkee assembled a team that included Commonwealth Architects, Branch and Associates and Capstone Contracting Co. to create an upscale 178-unit project. The four companies celebrated the grand opening of the Cookie Factory Lofts on Saturday, November 15.

The Cookie Factory Lofts

The Cookie Factory Lofts comprises 98 one-bedroom units, 61 two-bedroom units, seven three-bedroom units and 12 studios. Each apartment offers with large windows, maple floors and brick walls.

Units range between 548 and 1,494 square feet in size. According to the building’s website, monthly rents range between $850 and $2,500. Amenities include a community room, fitness center, pool, and a sitting area with fireplaces.

Residents are moving into the first group of completed units, and the remaining apartments are on track for completion next month.

“The large floor plates and raw industrial nature of the building made it ideal for conversion into contemporary living spaces,” said Lee Shadbolt, a principal at Commonwealth Architects, said in a statement. “The juxtaposition of requirements for modern lifestyles against the historic fabric of the building create a dynamic environment.”

Photos courtesy of Commonwealth Architects