Joint Venture Contracted to Build National Center for Civil, Human Rights

By Georgiana Mihaila, Associate Editor The long-awaited National Center for Human Rights in downtown Atlanta is getting closer to being built. With an estimated total cost of $125 million, the 100,000-square-foot facility is now merely $10 million short of its groundbreaking [...]

The long-awaited National Center for Human Rights in downtown Atlanta is getting closer to being built. With an estimated total cost of $125 million, the 100,000-square-foot facility is now merely $10 million short of its groundbreaking goal of $85 million.

Moreover, the center now has a construction management firm, which plans to break ground on the facility later this year. Michael Russell, Dave Moody and Tommy Holder have been chosen to build it and execute the visionary design of the Freelon/HOK architectural design team. The team has managed more than 50 projects together, providing a vast experience in both urban projects and cultural institutions. Among their duties, Russell, Moody and Holder will oversee all aspects of construction and monitor quality, costs and project timelines.

The Freelon Group of Research Triangle, N.C., and HOK, the team in charge of the design, has selected an iconic “linked arms” motif to reinforce the center’s mission of commemorating the groundbreaking contributions of Atlantans and Georgians to the historic struggle for African-American freedom and equality, as well as its commitment to serve as a space for ongoing dialogue, study and contributions to the resolution of current and future freedom struggles of all people at local, national and international levels. The center is designed to meet LEED certification, featuring a terracotta-clad building with an exterior courtyard that is to serve as amphitheater and exhibit space.

The center will be located on Pemberton Place, right next to the Centennial Olympic Park and adjacent to the World of Coca-Cola and the Georgia Aquarium. The land was donated by The Coca-Cola Co. in 2008, one of thousands of gestures of support the center has received.