New CDC Energy-Efficient Building Supports Atlanta’s ‘Green’ Ranking

By Georgiana Mihaila, Associate Editor Atlanta landed in 21st place on a list of greenest Canadian and U.S. cities produced by the Economist Intelligence Unit, part of a research study commissioned by Siemens. Atlanta has also been acknowledged as taking a major [...]

Atlanta landed in 21st place on a list of greenest Canadian and U.S. cities produced by the Economist Intelligence Unit, part of a research study commissioned by Siemens. Atlanta has also been acknowledged as taking a major stand for sustainability, having the highest percentage of LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design)-certified buildings. This is credited to Atlanta’s strict energy efficiency regulation for new buildings and its accelerated pace of certification.

A new addition to the list of LEED-certified Atlanta buildings will soon be the CDC Building 24, whose official ribbon cutting took place on June 23. This comes as the final piece of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s 10-year building program at the agency’s Roybal Campus in Atlanta. The design-build team, also present at the event on June 23, includes global architectural, planning and interior design firm tvdesign and Turner Construction Co., the nation’s largest healthcare construction company.

Adjacent to CDC’s headquarters, the 12-story building encompasses 311,000 square feet of office space and will house offices for 1,343 people. The building is currently pending LEED Gold certification from the U.S. Green Building Council. The CDC Building 24’s design exceeds baseline energy requirements of ASHRAE 90.1, with a 30 percent reduction in energy use; special attention has been given to fossil fuel consumption, use of daylight instead of artificial light and elimination of VOC-containing interior materials. In addition, a 30,000-gallon water cistern was included for water management and irrigation use.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention hopes that the now-complete Roybal Campus will be sufficiently state-of-the-art to attract top scientists and researchers to join its mission. The CDC also believes that its goal of public health cannot be achieved without paying special attention to environmental health.