New Master Plan will Create a More Bike-Friendly Baltimore

Just like neighboring Washington, D.C., the city of Baltimore is also doing its best to become greener and healthier. At the end of March, the city has adopted a new Bike Master Plan, which will help it expand its network of biking facilities and become more bicycle-friendly.

Just like neighboring Washington, D.C., the city of Baltimore is also doing its best to become greener and healthier. At the end of March, the city adopted a new Bike Master Plan which will help it expand its network of biking facilities and become more bicycle-friendly.

The city first adopted a Bike Master Plan in 2006. Since then, it has added over 125 miles of bike lanes and trails, and has installed over 600 bike racks in neighborhoods throughout Baltimore. The 2015 Bike Master Plan will take this work a step further.

The Baltimore City Planning Commission voted to adopt the new plan on March 26. It was created by the Department of Transportation and seeks to add over 100 miles of biking facilities in Baltimore over the next 15 years. The plan also calls for the implementation of 15 cycle projects within the next two years. Cycle tracks will be installed on Maryland Avenue/Cathedral Street, Madison Street and Center Street, the bus/bike lanes on Lombard and Pratt Streets will be improved, and over six miles of bike boulevards will be added in West Baltimore neighborhoods.

According to William Johnson, director of the Department of Transportation, the new plan will help Baltimore expand and enhance its biking infrastructure. “The 2015 Bicycle Master Plan seeks to uphold the vision of complete streets in Baltimore City which will enable more people to use biking as a viable form of transportation,” he said in a news release.

In a study released last month, BetterDoctor, a website dedicated to helping people find the right doctor for them, ranked Baltimore as the 22nd most bike-friendly city in the United States. In order to create the report, BetterDoctor looked at city investments on biking infrastructure, biking facilities, and the percentage of people who commute by bike. Baltimore’s overall score was 38.60. Neighboring Washington, D.C. had a much better score, 84.31. It occupies second place on the same list. (Read the full report here.)