Austin Okland Aviation Lands $740M Salt Lake City Airport Project

The upcoming North Concourse development will bring 30 new gates and will be linked to the South Concourse via a new passenger tunnel.

One year after announcing the addition of the North Concourse to the $2.9 billion Terminal Redevelopment Plan at Salt Lake City International Airport, the Salt Lake City Department of Airports has awarded the construction contract for the project to Austin Okland Aviation, a joint venture of Austin Commercial and Okland Construction Co. The North Concourse carries a development price tag of $740 million.

Salt Lake City International Airport
Salt Lake City International Airport

“We’ve studied the alternatives to accommodate passenger growth at Salt Lake City International Airport. Building the North Concourse sooner, rather than later, is the best solution for the future,” Maureen Riley, executive director of the SLCDA, said in a prepared statement announcing the decision to build the additional concourse.

Austin Okland’s work will yield 30 new gates, which will replace aging counterparts and pave the way for the airport to accommodate anticipated increases in passenger traffic. The design of the project allows for room for growth—specifically, an additional 15 gates if passenger demand dictates. When all is said and done, the North Concourse will be linked to the South Concourse and the airport’s terminal via a new passenger tunnel.

Austin Okland is on schedule to complete the two-phase development in 2020.

Salt Lake City International Airport is one of a bevy of airport expansion projects in the works across the U.S. The $4 billion makeover of New York’s LaGuardia Airport is moving forward. In Florida, Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport’s Terminal 4 Federal Inspection Services Expansion is underway. And the list goes on. “Despite general sluggishness in the global economy since the financial crisis, air passenger traffic has been growing. Owing to this, there continues to be investment in new airports and expansions, as passenger numbers reach design capacity,” according to a report by information solutions provider Timetric.

Image courtesy of Salt Lake City Department of Airports