Petro Waste Environmental Proposes $5M Oil-Field Waste Disposal Site

San Antonio-based Petro Waste Environmental, a company that provides environmental services, has proposed an oil-field waste disposal and treatment site for a 204-acre piece of land in Nordheim, DeWitt County, one of Eagle Ford Shale’s busiest drilling areas. The application has been presented to the Texas Railroad Commission for the second time, after being denied in 2013 because of the risk the proposed facility inflicted on the area, possibly causing or allowing pollution to surface or subsurface waters and because of protests by local residents.

San Antonio-based Petro Waste Environmental, a company that provides environmental services, has proposed an oil-field waste disposal and treatment site for a 204-acre piece of land in Nordheim, DeWitt County, one of Eagle Ford Shale’s busiest drilling areas. The application has been presented to the Texas Railroad Commission for the second time, after being denied in 2013 because of the risk the proposed facility inflicted on the area, possibly causing or allowing pollution to enter surface or subsurface waters and because of protests by local residents.

Nordheim is about 75 miles southwest of San Antonio. The company has estimated its investment in the proposed facility, which would be developed in the first quarter of 2015, will total $5 million. The site will employ 10 to 15 workers.

The current environmental regulations state that oil and hydrocarbon waste must be disposed of in specialized facilities such as the one proposed by Petro Waste Environmental. The closest sites capable of accepting this type of waste are more than an hour and a half away, and the DeWitt area and the neighboring counties are in the middle of the drilling process.

“The demand for this (landfill) is coming from the industry,” PWE CEO George Wommack said. “All the major oil-and-gas companies want to dispose of their waste as safely as possible, and they’d rather have it done at a facility where it’s going to be constantly monitored by a company whose business is managing environmental risk.”

The Texas Railroad Commission will hold a hearing on Sept. 10, when it will be decided whether the facility will be approved or if suggestions will be offered to avoid jeopardizing the area’s environmental safety and integrity.