USGBC: Top 10 States for LEED Green Building

A 57-story, 1.3 million-square-foot Class A office tower in Chicago has earned Platinum and Gold LEED certifications from the U.S. Green Building Council.


Built along the Chicago River by Hines, 300 North LaSalle, a 57-story, 1.3 million-square-foot Class A office tower in Chicago was designed to be extremely energy efficient with a façade of articulated glass and stainless steel that maximizes daylight and minimizes solar gain. It has a green roof and water and energy conservation systems. Tenants and property managers recycle paper, glass, aluminum and plastic. The tower has earned Platinum and Gold LEED certifications from the U.S. Green Building Council – Platinum for Existing Buildings and Gold for its Core & Shell.

Owned by KBS REIT II and managed by Hines, it is one of two Hines-related properties highlighted by the USGBC in its ranking of the Top 10 States for LEED. The other Hines building cited by the USGBC is Fifty South Sixth, a 29-story, Class A office tower in Minneapolis. The 698,600-square-foot building developed and owned by Hines has LEED Gold certification. Green features include energy efficient lighting with reduced mercury content; use of environmentally safe cleaning products and practices; water use reduction and a comprehensive recycling program.

At both buildings, Hines offers its GREEN OFFICE for Tenants program, which assists the tenants in ways to reduce their carbon footprints.

“We are very pleased that 300 North LaSalle and Fifty South Sixth are being highlighted in the USGBC’s Top 10 States for LEED,” Gary Holtzer, global sustainability officer at the privately-owned Houston-based firm, told Commercial Property Executive. “We have partnered with the USGBC since its founding to identify best operating practices and cutting-edge techniques in order to stay in the forefront of building operations.”

“We have continually sought new ways to maximize the efficiency of our buildings and are leading the industry with new building strategies and putting technologies into practice in an economically viable way, which is evidenced by our La Jolla Commons project (in San Diego) with LPL Financial – the largest net-zero energy building developed for lease in the U.S.,” Holtzer added.

Topping the USGBC list was Illinois with 171 projects certified in 2013 for a total of 29,415,284 square feet and a per-capita square footage of 2.29. Maryland followed with 119 certified projects in 2013 for a total of 12,696,429 square feet for a per-capita square footage of 2.20. Virginia placed third with 160 properties and 16,868,693 square feet receiving LEED certifications in 2013 for a per-capital square footage of 2.11. Massachusetts came in fourth with 101 projects certified in 2013 and 13,684,430 square feet for a per-capita square footage of 2.09. Rounding out the top 5 were New York and California, which tied. New York had 259 projects certified in 2013 and 37,839,395 square feet for a per-capita square footage of 1.95. California had 595 projects certified in 2013 and 72,729476 square feet for a per-capita square footage of 1.95.

Oregon placed sixth, followed by North Carolina, Colorado, Hawaii and Minnesota. Since Washington, D.C., is a federal district it was not ranked but it had 106 projects certified in 2013 and 19,524,216 square feet for a per-capita square footage of 32.45.

USGBC calculates the list using per-capita figures as a measure of the human element of the green building, allowing for a fair comparison among states with population differences and number of overall buildings, the council said. It is based on 2010 U.S. Census data and includes commercial and institutional green building projects that were certified throughout 2013.

Making the list for the first time were Oregon, which certified 47 projects representing 1.83 square feet per person; North Carolina with 133 projects representing1.80 square feet per resident; Hawaii with17 projects and 1.71 square feet per resident and Minnesota with 51 projects certified or 1.55 square feet per resident.

“The list of the Top 10 States for LEED is a continuing indicator of the widespread recognition of our national imperative to create healthier, high-performing buildings that are better for the environment as well as the people who use them every day,” Rick Fedrizzi, president, CEO & founding chair of USGBC, said in a news release.
Skanska USA, another commercial real estate firm focused on sustainable building practices, had several properties included in the USGBC report. One is 1776 Wilson Boulevard, a 139,593-square-foot office and retail building that is the first LEED Platinum property in Arlington, Va. It has a green roof, solar panel, fitness center, bicycle storage and is located within walking distance of two Metro train stations.

The second property noted by USGBC is Skanska USA’s own office building in Rockville, Md. The 13,000-square-foot office building at 700 King Farm Boulevard achieved LEED Gold certification for the interior space. DCS Design, the McLean, Va.-based architecture and design firm responsible for the interior said on its website that glass walls, partitions, workstation panels and doors were used throughout the office to bring in natural light. The firm used salvaged materials and recycled finishes, fixtures and furniture.

The USGBC list included other notable green projects such as Aulani, A Disney Resort & Spa in Kapolei, Hawaii, LEED Silver; M&T Bank Stadium in Baltimore, LEED Gold; Barclays Center in Brooklyn, N.Y., LEED Silver. The Carlton College Weitz Center for Creativity in Northfield, Minn., received LEED Gold, the college’s third project to earn LEED certification.